Month: July 2017

Late in April, approximately 1,000 students in the Upward Bound Program at The University of Maine Presque Isle (UMPI) received notice that their funds would not be continued, due to the line spacing of their funding application. Programs like Upward Bound work to “level the playing field” by allowing students from low-income families entry into
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Educators were cheering over newly released results from the College Board showing significant increases in the number of females, Latino and African-American students who took either the Advanced Placement computer science exam or the new computer science principles exam this spring. “I am over the moon. These numbers are amazing,” said Hadi Partovi, chief executive
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Between 2009 and 2014 the enrollment in teacher education programs dropped from 691,00 to 451,000, a 35% reduction. That’s a pretty shocking number. Fewer young people are interested in becoming teachers, and that’s a problem because school enrollment is projected to increase by roughly three million students in the next decade. While those numbers are
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Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos hosted a meeting to discuss sexual violence on college campuses on Thursday. One of the sessions included men accused of sexual assault ― and many sexual assault survivors are not happy.  DeVos met with three groups of stakeholders in separate 90-minute roundtable discussions, according to the Education Department. One of the meetings
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The health and economic security of America’s children from low-income families are in jeopardy with the recently introduced “Welfare Reform and Upward Mobility Act” by Congressman Jim Jordan and Senator Mike Lee. When millions of Americans lost work during the Great Recession, one federal program automatically stepped up to help displaced workers provide food for
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More than 100 survivors of campus sexual assault wrote a letter to President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, demanding: “Exactly who are you here to serve?” The letter, published on Wednesday morning and signed by 118 student sexual assault survivors from 25 states, urges Trump and his administration to guard the civil rights of sexual assault
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A high school newspaper reporter snagged himself a 45-minute interview with Defense Secretary James “Mad Dog” Mattis after spotting the Pentagon chief’s personal phone number online. Teddy Fischer, a rising junior at Mercer Island High School in Washington state, was inspired by a profile of Mattis in The New Yorker in May, his journalism teacher, Chris Twombley,
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AUSTIN, Texas—”Would you go?” This is the question that silences 16-year-old Jacqui, tightens her wide smile into a thin line, and provokes a low sigh. Her mother sits next to her—motionless—her gaze transfixed on a crack in the sidewalk. The answer is no. Simply, reluctantly, painfully, no. If push comes to shove, and federal immigration
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One of the most frustrating things I’ve ever been forced to do as a teacher is to ignore my students and concentrate instead on the data. I teach 8th grade language arts at a high-poverty, mostly minority school in Western Pennsylvania. During my double period classes, I’m with these children for at least 80 minutes
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Charter school advocates claim to support higher standards and provide better education than traditional public schools. But Carol Burris, executive director of the Network for Public Education, has repeatedly documented in the Washington Post’s Answer Sheet that their claims are “fake news” unsupported by data. Despite the questionable performance of charter schools, New York State
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NEA President Lily Eskelsen García greets Friend of Education award recipient LeVar Burton at the 2017 NEA Representative Assembly (Photo: Scott Iskowitz) Vigorous debates and discussions over social justice, the dangers posed by the Trump-DeVos education agenda, and ending the proliferation of unaccountable charter schools dominated the 96th NEA Representative Assembly (RA) held July 2
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At its annual meeting on Tuesday, the educators of the National Education Association drew a sharp new line between charter schools that have a positive effect on public education and those unaccountable, privately managed charter schools that hurt public schools and students. A new policy statement adopted by the assembly denounces unaccountable charters as a “failed and
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