Month: November 2017

When Matthew Powell of Kentucky began his profession as instructional assistant and custodian, he was handed a big wad of keys and told to go upstairs. With no further direction, Powell figured out his professional path—for the most part—on his own. Looking back now, “I wish I had a mentor,” he reflects, “someone to go
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L.M. Elliott is a former Washington journalist turned novelist who recently published Suspect Red [Disney-Hyperion], a young-adult work of historical fiction set in a time of national paranoia and xenophobia. (No, not 2017!) The year is 1953, during the nation’s Second Red Scare, when thousands of Americans were accused of being communists, Elliott’s story is
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WASHINGTON ― Teachers who use their own money for classroom supplies could lose a tax break under the Republican legislation wending its way through Congress. The tax code currently allows educators to subtract what they’ve spent on teaching expenses ― up to $250 ― from their gross income. The tax bill that Republicans pushed through
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With their emphasis on hands-on experiments, California’s new science standards have turned classrooms into noisy, messy laboratories. That’s been popular with students and teachers who say it’s a more effective way to learn science than studying textbooks and memorizing facts, but the cost of all those underwater robots and exploding chemicals has left some teachers
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WASHINGTON — At the age of 3, Tyrone Colson was diagnosed with Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic abnormality that is often accompanied by developmental disabilities. Because of this diagnosis, an individualized education plan (IEP) — documents detailing Colson’s special needs, and a plan for how his school would help him reach his potential — was already
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Shocking news in last week’s Sun-Sentinel: Almost three months into the school year, thousands of public school students in South Florida still don’t have a permanent teacher —a problem expected to get worse as more educators flee the classroom and the number of those seeking teaching degrees plummets. Okay, not shocking. Utterly predictable, given Florida’s
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Terry Jess is a social studies teacher at Bellevue High School in Washington State. He’s also an equity leader within his school and district, and a founder and board member of Educators for Justice, a non-profit organization that works with teachers and education support professionals to create safe and supportive educational experiences for all students.
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The just-released Network for Public Education (NPE) report, “Charters and Consequences,” documents charter school scams supported by wealthy “philanthropists,” powerful political interests and an assortment of entrepreneurs looking to make money off of education. Eleven studies look at the charter school assault on public education, from Oakland, California to Brooklyn, New York with stops in
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In a briefing on Capitol Hill Tuesday in Washington, D.C., educators highlighted a recent report that shows how community schools improve academics and student health while encouraging parents, business, and other community leaders to work together toward common goals. “When you put your focus on children, community schools bring people and institutions together in a way
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About a third of the students with disabilities who enroll in a four-year college or university graduate within eight years. For those that enroll in two-year schools, the outcomes aren’t much better: 41 percent, according to federal data. The dismal outcomes aren’t because students with disabilities can’t handle the coursework. The vast majority of special
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The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) has issued a new position statement recommending that middle and high school start classes no earlier than 8:30 a.m.— and is urging local, state, and national leaders to take action to help schools make this change. Such a schedule gives students a chance to get healthy sleep and has
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A filing Monday with the Securities Exchange Commission by troubled Bridgepoint Education raises questions about the company’s continued compliance with a federal law requiring for-profit colleges to obtain at least 10 percent of their revenue from sources other than Department of Education-provided student grants and loans. Bridgeport’s access to other funding was placed in jeopardy
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About 34,000 American youths are behind bars, the Prison Policy Institute estimates, and two-thirds for non-violent offenses. An additional 20,000 are confined to residential facilities, and another 10,000 are imprisoned on any given night in adult prisons and jails. Consider this: The reason might be money. Most educators have heard of the school-to-prison pipeline—the practices
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The U.S. Department of Education under Secretary Betsy DeVos this week began the process of dismantling the rules issued under President Obama to constrain the predatory abuses of for-profit colleges. At the end of the troubling first day of what’s called negotiated rule-making, members of the public were given an opportunity to speak.  I was
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Published in partnership with The Trace, a nonprofit, investigative newsroom covering gun violence in America.  Polls underscore a paradox when it comes to Americans and gun violence: Even before the horrors of Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs, Texas, surveys showed that mass shootings leave many of us feeling scared and concerned. But research also reveals a
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