Month: December 2017

A federal judge on Wednesday put the final nail in the coffin of Arizona’s Republican-backed law banning Mexican-American studies classes in Tucson public schools.   The final judgment issued by U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima after a two-week bench trial last summer caps a seven-year legal battle over conservative attempts to restrict what books could
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Actress Jenna Fischer apologized on Wednesday after Twitter users corrected an inaccurate tweet she wrote about the unpopular GOP tax bill over the holidays.  “The Office” star originally tweeted on Saturday that the bill would eliminate a tax deduction for school teachers who bought their own supplies.  “I can’t stop thinking about how school teachers can
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On Sunday, The New York Times posed a question to book lovers: ”In an Era of Online Outrage, Do Sensitivity Readers Result in Better Books, or Censorship?” It’s a hard question to answer ― mainly because the dichotomy it presents is reductive and false. Sensitivity readers are not censors or free speech police. They’re people
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Dervis Hizarci is a secondary school teacher in Kreuzberg, one of Berlin’s most diverse neighborhoods, and the chairman of the Kreuzberg Initiative against Anti-Semitism (KIgA). As a Berliner with Turkish-Muslim roots, he has seen two disturbing developments firsthand: growing hate against Muslims, and worrisome anti-Semitism among Muslims. One day, a student in his classroom called
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On Dec. 23, 2017, KOB.com (Albuquerque) published an article concerning the survival of the Southwest Aeronautics Mathematics and Science Academy (SAMS), one of a group of New Mexico charter schools that suffered the effects of massive fraud perpetrated by its founder/ administrator, David Scott Glasrud, over a 15-year period (2000-2014). Glasrud founded the first school, Southwest Secondary
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In 2013, Bill de Blasio was elected mayor of New York City on a program that included a promise to abandon his predecessor’s policy of closing “struggling” schools. Instead of closure, a “Renewal” approach would improve school performance through heavy investment of money and support. Last month de Blasio was reelected Mayor with the same
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The nonprofit organization behind “Sesame Street” has been awarded a $100 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, the largest of its kind, to create programming for children displaced by Syria’s civil war. Sesame Workshop, in partnership with International Rescue Committee, was selected for the foundation’s coveted 100&Change grant on Wednesday for a proposal to bring early
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When the federal government created the National School Lunch Program in 1946, it was viewed at the time as a national security initiative. Undernourished students, after all, would likely not be fit enough to serve in the armed forces. But it was also described more broadly as strengthening the nation as a whole.    “We have
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“Why We Drop Out”: Understanding and Disrupting Student Pathways to Leaving School by Deborah L. Feldman, ‎ Antony T. Smith,‎ and Barbara L. Waxman, recounts the compelling stories of kids who explain in their own words why they decided to leave school. NEA Today spoke with Feldman to talk about what she learned from her interviews with the more
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On the morning of Nov. 14, staff members at Rancho Tehama Elementary School in Corning, California, heard the sound of a single gunshot in the vicinity of the campus. After two more shots rang out, the school secretary issued a verbal command over the loudspeaker to implement lockdown procedure. The whole school was on lockdown
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I love Newtown. I love the people. I love the landscape. I love the annual Labor Day parade. I love it more now, having watched the town wrestle over the unanswerable question of what to be in the wake of unimaginable tragedy. Newtown is different than it was before the events of December 14, 2012.
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There are many provisions of the Republican tax bill that favor the wealthy and do little for lower and middle-income people. But what may largely be lost from public view are some wrongheaded provisions that would have very damaging consequences for the nation’s most distinguished colleges and universities – and for the nation. It will
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Crosby Bromley, a physical education teacher in Salem-Keizer, Oregon, never really considered herself a “political” person. To her, the term generally conjured up conflict and power struggles. “I’m a confident person, but I usually prefer to mediate and help people compromise and reach a solution,” she explains. “But even doing that on a larger scale
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It’s no secret that most middle and high schools start too early in the morning. Research has been clear on this for decades. Major health groups like the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Medical Association have issued calls to start middle and high schools no earlier than 8:30 a.m. Schools following their advice find
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We know teachers appreciate all the gifts their students ― and let’s be honest, their students’ parents ― give them, but what do they really want for the holidays? We asked teachers what’s on their wish lists this year (hint: there are a lot of mentions of Target). Check out the fun ideas below. “I teach
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