Month: May 2018

Despite the prickly challenges it presents, sex education has always been an issue that many educators have championed, perhaps even more so now as the #MeToo movement has forced the nation to confront the pervasiveness of sexual assault in our society. Young people are also inundated with increasingly confusing messages. “The world is changing so
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Over the past few months, educators across America have staged walkouts and demonstrations to bring attention to abysmal conditions facing our schools and students after decades of funding neglect. It took courage, and also stamina. Marching and rallying for hours a day, several days in a row, in the elements, is not for the faint
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With so many food blogs, cookbooks and Pinterest boards, it’s hard to be original with your recipes these days. Fortunately, a group of preschoolers are proving that creativity in the kitchen is still possible.  Twitter user Jordan Adams shared some hilarious and adorable snippets from his nephew Ethan’s pre-K class cookbook, which features recipes the preschoolers had
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Please don’t call them “at-risk” students, says Rick Miller, founder of Kids At Hope and professor at Arizona State University. After spending years in educational research, Miller has concluded that it’s not the crime in their neighborhoods, the absence of a father at home, or any other so-called “risk factor” that holds students back in
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A member of one of Harvard University’s governing bodies resigned Tuesday over ethical concerns surrounding the school’s multibillion-dollar endowment, including investments in fossil fuels, an action that some environmentalists described as a “powerful act of conscience.” With just one day left on her six-year term on Harvard’s Board of Overseers, Kathryn A. “Kat” Taylor resigned in
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A new study from the National Association for College Admission Counseling provides evidence that test-optional policies ― a variety of policies that allow students not to submit scores on standardized tests like the SAT or GRE during the admissions process ― can help colleges improve their diversity without sacrificing academic quality. The study found that
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Bargaining team members of the St. Paul Federation of Teachers assemble after negotiating their contract.(photo: Patrick Mulvaney) In December, Educational Assistants (EA) and School and Community Service Professionals (SCSP) bargaining units of the St. Paul Federation of Teachers (SPFT) in Minnesota filed for mediations with the state at the same time as the unit comprised
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The Texas community rocked by Friday’s mass school shooting that killed eight students and two teachers came together to celebrate the life of Sabika Sheikh, a 17-year-old Pakistani exchange student who had been studying in the U.S. through a State Department-sponsored program.  Mourners, including her host family, the mayor of Houston and Santa Fe High School classmates,
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Just two days after a young man opened fire on his classmates and teachers at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, the National Rifle Association’s incoming president, Oliver North, blamed Ritalin and a “culture of violence.”   On “Fox News Sunday,” the controversial Iran-Contra figure told host Chris Wallace that the solution for the increasing number of
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Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) on Sunday pushed for arming teachers and reducing the number of entrances into school buildings after the latest mass shooting at a U.S. school afflicted his state. Patrick, a staunch conservative, appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union” and ABC’s “This Week” to discuss responses after a lone gunman opened
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People embrace outside the Alamo Gym where students and parents wait to reunite following a shooting at Santa Fe High School Friday, May 18, 2018, in Santa Fe, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP) Yet another deadly school shooting, this one at Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, thirty miles outside Houston,
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