Month: July 2018

For decades, California 4th-graders have studied the Golden State: its geography, people and history. Now, historians and Native American teachers are pushing to broaden that curriculum to include more on the culture and history of the state’s original inhabitants. “For so many years, the story of California Indians has never really been part of classrooms,”
0 Comments
A superintendent in Holmdel, New Jersey, accused of publicly defecating on a local high school’s track and football field, has resigned from his job. Thomas Tramaglini, 42, resigned as superintendent for the Kenilworth School District on Thursday night, the New Jersey Star-Ledger reports. An email to staffers said Tramaglini was resigning due to “events unrelated to
0 Comments
While a dress code is supposed to make the school environment more conducive to learning, it frequently does the opposite. In the past year, schools all over the country made national news for the ways they enforce their dress code—asking a student to put duct tape over the holes in her jeans, suspending a student
0 Comments
Summer brain drain. Summer setback. Summer slide. Summer learning loss. Most parents have heard a version of the idea that over summer vacation, kids lose some of what they learn during the school year. But they’ll be happy to know there are actually realistic (and affordable!) ways to combat it. Dr. Katrina Lindsay, a clinical
0 Comments
A heartwarming viral Twitter thread involving a tender moment between children at a swimming pool and a Muppet with autism is being hailed for showing why media representation, specifically for children, is so powerful. “Don’t tell me representation doesn’t matter,” wrote Twitter user @shiphitsthefan, who goes by Ship and uses the pronouns they/them. Ship shared the
0 Comments
Balancing appropriate discipline with school safety, classroom effectiveness, and positive outcomes for students is a daunting task for teachers and administrators everywhere. Many schools continue to rely on exclusionary discipline, removing students from the classroom through suspension or expulsion for various innfractions. The damaging long-lasting effects of “zero tolerance” has gotten more attention over the
0 Comments
A group of 25 black students from Atlanta, competing against hundreds of young scholars from around the world, made history over the weekend with winning performances in a Harvard debate tournament. The young scholars were the first backed by scholarships through the Atlanta-based Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project to participate in Harvard’s summer debate council residency.
0 Comments
The mayor of Wilmington, Delaware, has apologized to a local Islamic school after a group of Muslim children wearing shirts, shorts and hijabs were pressured to leave a public pool. Mayor Mike Purzycki admitted in a statement Saturday that city officials at the Foster Brown public pool “used poor judgment” in response to the students’ religious clothing
0 Comments
Public schools across the United States are scrambling to manage students’ mental health ― and the problem is only getting worse. One in five kids between ages 3 and 17 shows signs of a mental health disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The nonprofit Mental Health America has noted a 3 percent
0 Comments
Not only do some Arizona teachers have to contend with mice in their classrooms, they also have to buy their own glue traps. Classroom globes that spin to reveal two Germanys, antiquated plumbing that regularly floods a school hallway also known as the “poo pod,” decades-old textbooks that overlook the last 10 elements added to
0 Comments
Roughly five months have passed since Florida’s deadly Parkland school shooting, and the public has yet to see exterior video surveillance footage that may shed light on the actions of law enforcement. On Tuesday during a hearing before the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal in West Palm Beach, a school board attorney and a
0 Comments