Month: September 2018

On Equal Pay Day this April ― representing the day American women’s pay finally catches up to what men earned the previous year ― I joined women across the U.S. in vocal protest for fair wages. I also knew, however, that I’d need to save some of my energy for Sept. 27, 2018: Native Women Equal
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In the summer of 2017, Charleena Lyles, a pregnant 30-year-old black woman was fatally shot by two white Seattle police officers in her home as her three young children looked on. Lyles, who had called the police to report a burglary, reportedly suffered from mental illness. She pulled a knife out of her pocket when
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Steadfast public opposition, educator advocacy, and a meager (at best) track record has slowed down the push to expand school vouchers nationwide. Still, voucher advocates soldier on, buoyed by Betsy DeVos’ determination and a rebranding effort (“education savings accounts,” “tuition tax credits”) designed to make siphoning public money for private school tuition more politically appealing.
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From the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting to the headline-making effects of school bullying, school safety is a hot-button topic in the U.S. Now that kids across the country have gone back to school, parents may be facing questions from their children or coming up with their own concerns about safety.  Although it’s important
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The sexual assault allegation against Brett Kavanaugh is rocking the world of Ivy League law, an elite feeding ground for the Supreme Court and federal judiciary. At Yale Law School, the embattled Supreme Court nominee’s alma mater, a growing number of students are denouncing administrators for their rote support of Kavanaugh and are demanding changes
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For the duration of his time on campus, a former student recalls, the guiding principle among Georgetown Preparatory School students was straightforward: Don’t be a narc. “Don’t tell, don’t tell,” said the former student, who overlapped at the school in North Bethesda, Maryland, with current Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, class of ’83. It was
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In a world of credit cards, online banking, tax codes, investments and retirement plans, keeping up with money can be tough for adults, and even more so for kids. So, for the many parents who want to teach their kid economic ideas and prepare them for their financial futures, where the heck is the starting
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An Indianapolis guidance counselor told Ellen DeGeneres her future remains “in limbo” after officials at the Catholic high school where she works put her on paid administrative leave last month when they learned she’s in a same-sex marriage.  Shelly Fitzgerald dropped by “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Monday, where she discussed being told by administrators
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From hurricanes and tornadoes to earthquakes, mudslides and even extreme blizzards and flooding, families around the world have faced the trauma of natural disasters. As Hurricane Florence batters the Carolinas, parents living in and outside the storm’s path are facing questions about it from their children. HuffPost spoke to experts in child and adolescent psychiatry about
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In 2016, a federal report found that nearly 21 million Americans over the age of 12 struggle with substance addictions. In recent months, stories of celebrity overdoses and the opioid epidemic have inundated the news. And in the United States, an estimated 8.7 million children under the age of 18 live with at least one parent
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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Wednesday was on the losing end of a lawsuit accusing the Department of Education of illegally delaying regulations set by the Obama administration to protect student loan borrowers from predatory colleges. Attorneys general from 19 states and the District of Columbia filed the lawsuit against DeVos after her department began rolling
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