Month: January 2019

Take the Northeast, for example. Looking at the most recent SSA data from 2017, we identified the most popular baby names for boys and girls born in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont (the states the Census Bureau defines as the Northeast). While there was much overlap
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President Donald Trump praised the idea of introducing Bible literacy classes into public schools on Monday, naturally sparking questions on Twitter about Trump’s own knowledge of the Bible.  In a morning tweet, the president offered encouragement to politicians in several states who have pushed legislation that would allow public schools to offer an optional elective
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Something many teachers and pediatricians have long suspected to be true is that child abuse incidents increase when report cards go home. They’re right, a University of Florida (UF) research team has found—but only when report cards go home on Fridays. UF research scientist Melissa Bright, a NEA Higher Ed member, was talking last year
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In game theory, cooperation produces the optimal solution to the prisoner’s dilemma. In evolutionary theory, it’s how genes help define genomes. In social theory, it’s how hunter-gatherer societies evolve into nation states. Cooperation is the fundamental principle that shapes humans and human society. And humans cooperate for one simple reason: There is strength — and
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Comedian Bert Kreischer shared an entertaining story while appearing on “Conan” in August 2018. The topic: His daughter’s “period party.” When Kreischer’s younger daughter first started her period, she asked him to pick up some supplies for a period party. She responded to his initial confusion by noting that “all the girls are throwing them”
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Photo: Joe Brusky Students and educators are back in their classrooms January 23, as the United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) and Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) ratified a Tentative Agreement (TA), ending a six-day strike. More than 30,000 members hit the picket lines on January 14 to fight for their students and the resources
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When we moved to a new town last summer, I wasn’t sure how my 12-year-old son would make new friends. I saw lots of kids his age biking around our new neighborhood or playing ball at the park. But when you’re 12, it’s not easy to just walk over to a strange kid and introduce
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United Teachers Los Angeles has overwhelmingly voted to end a strike of more than 30,000 educators, leaders announced Tuesday evening. The agreement ends a strike of over 30,000 educators in the nation’s second-largest school district and puts teachers back in their classrooms Wednesday. “It’s a historic day today in Los Angeles,” UTLA President Alex Caputo-Pearl said
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The University of Notre Dame will cover up a series of murals depicting Christopher Columbus amid backlash over the paintings’ stereotypical and inaccurate portrayal of Native Americans and their relationship with white European explorers, the school announced. The 12 murals, painted by Luigi Gregori in the 1880s, adorn the entrance of the university’s Main Building,
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Friday’s first-ever Indigenous People’s March in Washington should have been an occasion for peaceful protest and respectful acknowledgment of Native Americans’ experience in our country. Instead, a sad and unfortunately predictable confluence of events made that sort of dignified reflection impossible. The group of high school boys from Kentucky’s Covington Catholic High School, seen on tape
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When we met, I was the angry, hovering mom you dreaded interacting with. Emails, phone calls, in-person meetings ― your lips tightened before forcing a smile. You knew moms like me and children like mine. When my son ran from the classroom, you’d roll your eyes. When he’d pace in the back of the room,
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Social justice is about distributing resources fairly and treating all students equitably so that they feel safe and secure—physically and psychologically. Sadly, a look at schools across the nation makes it clear that fair distribution of resources and equitable treatment don’t always happen. Students in poorly-funded schools don’t have the technology, new books, or art
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This article is the fifth installment of “One Year Later: Larry Nassar And The Women Who Made Us Listen,” a seven-part series that commemorates the seven days women stood in a Lansing, Michigan, courtroom last year and faced their abuser, former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State trainer Larry Nassar. Read more: Day 1, Day 2, Day 3,
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With the second half of the school year underway, it’s likely some students don’t have the same teacher they had in the fall. Mid-year teacher turnover doesn’t occur as frequently as end-of-year turnover, but it’s likely more prevalent than most people think. U.S. teachers leave the profession at higher rates than other countries, but the
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