Teachers and Their Classrooms

Thanks largely to a nationwide campaign by educators, the country is finally talking about how we can recruit, support and retain teachers. This is an important discussion, says Richard Ingersoll,  professor of education and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, because “the teaching force has been transformed over the last 30 years, with significant financial, structural,
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Technology and the connected world put a fork in the old model of teaching: instructor in front of the class, sage on the stage, students madly taking notes,textbooks opened, homework as worksheets, and tests regurgitating facts. Did I miss anything? This model is outdated not because it didn’t work (many statistics show students ranked higher
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Something many teachers and pediatricians have long suspected to be true is that child abuse incidents increase when report cards go home. They’re right, a University of Florida (UF) research team has found—but only when report cards go home on Fridays. UF research scientist Melissa Bright, a NEA Higher Ed member, was talking last year
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Social justice is about distributing resources fairly and treating all students equitably so that they feel safe and secure—physically and psychologically. Sadly, a look at schools across the nation makes it clear that fair distribution of resources and equitable treatment don’t always happen. Students in poorly-funded schools don’t have the technology, new books, or art
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It’s news to exactly no one that being an educator is stressful. Longhours are spent in an environment that churns with mental, visual, and emotional stimulation. And when what should be the end of the work day finally arrives, there is still more to do. For educators, the list of stress and anxiety-inducing triggers is endless—and potentially dangerous
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From practical and personal to silly and sentimental, the gifts educators receive definitely leave a lasting impression. We asked our Facebook fans to share their most memorable gifts, and, in the spirit of the season, they delivered. Happy Holidays! A half bottle of used perfume. A fifth grade boy who lost his mom said I
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Judi Nicolay has taught in Brussels for 24 years (Photo: Leilani Hyatt) Randy Ricks teaches at Lester Middle School located on Kadena U.S. Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan. Tokyo, Bangkok, and Hong Kong are a short plane flight away. “I love living in a foreign country and experiencing the local culture,” says Ricks, a
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Whether you’re a classroom teacher, school counselor, paraeducator, bus driver, cafeteria worker or school secretary, everyone who works in a public school faces a new school year ready to do the job they love. But they are also prepared to confront undeniable challenges. These challenges may differ district to district, school to school, but one
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In 2016, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) polled 40,000 public school teachers across the country as part of the National Teacher and Principal Survey. The survey covers a wide range of topics about the teaching profession. The complete report will be issued later in the year, but some of the results from the
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Despite the prickly challenges it presents, sex education has always been an issue that many educators have championed, perhaps even more so now as the #MeToo movement has forced the nation to confront the pervasiveness of sexual assault in our society. Young people are also inundated with increasingly confusing messages. “The world is changing so
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When author and innovation expert Ted Dintersmith set out to visit public schools in all fifty states during a single school year, he hoped to find solutions to the most vexing problems facing classroom educators. He soon discovered that the very solutions he sought had already been found – by the teachers themselves. All we
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Do you sleep with the phone next to your bed? Or worse, on or under your pillow with it pinging or vibrating with every text, Tweet, or notification? Do you feel insecure if your device isn’t nearby or on your person? If you say yes, to any of these queries, maybe it’s time for a
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During the 1990s, many school districts adopted zero-tolerance disciplinary policies mandating suspensions for certain offenses, including cursing, shoving other students, and other minor infractions. It became evident that these practices unduly targeted students of color thereby widening the achievement gap and prematurely introducing minority students to the criminal justice system, according to panelists participating in
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